“God Save the King” sung for the first time in a stadium


This Saturday September 10, at the Kia Oval in London, ahead of the cricket match between England and South Africa, the new British anthem
Clive Rose/Getty Images This Saturday September 10, at the Kia Oval in London, ahead of the cricket match between England and South Africa, the new British anthem « God Save the King » was sung for the first time at an event jock.

Clive Rose/Getty Images

This Saturday September 10, at the Kia Oval in London, ahead of the cricket match between England and South Africa, the new British anthem « God Save the King » was sung for the first time at an event jock.

UNITED KINGDOM – It has been 70 years since those words last resounded in the UK. This Saturday, September 10, as England and South Africa clashed in cricket on the lawn of the Kia Oval in London, the new British anthem was sung after a tribute to Elizabeth II, who died two days earlier. at the age of 96.

Thus, and while his son was officially proclaimed and therefore became King Charles III, it was  » God Save the King  » and no more  » God Save the Queen » that the 27,000 or so spectators shouted in the gray London.

And both in the public and among the British players, the voice of soprano Laura Wright caused great emotion, as you can see in the video below :

As Britain’s PA news agency reported, it was the first time the new anthem had been sung during a televised sporting event.

Black Banners and Moment of Silence

Indeed, the series of matches between South Africans and English was interrupted this Friday, the day after the death of the queen, but it was finally decided to resume it, and this while most of the other sporting events including the national football championship were canceled after the death of the sovereign.

England captain Ben Stokes said on Friday that it would be for him and his family a  » honor than playing in memory of the Queen given her love of the sport. And in other sports, starting with Premier League football, voices have been raised to lament the decision to suspend the championship, saying minutes of silence, black armbands and the tributes of crowded stadiums would have made a better farewell to the one who will have spent 70 years on the throne.

This Saturday, at the Kia Oval, all billboards had been removed and replaced by black banners adorned with the face of the queen and messages paying tribute to her. A minute’s silence was also observed before kick-off, as part of a ten-day national mourning that will lead the country until the funeral of Elizabeth II on September 19.

See also on the HuffPost:



Laisser un commentaire